Determinants of child and forced marriage in Morocco: stakeholder perspectives on health, policies and human rights

In Morocco, the social and legal framework surrounding sexual and reproductive health has transformed greatly in the past decade, especially with the introduction of the new Family Law or Moudawana. Yet, despite raising the minimum age of marriage for girls and stipulating equal rights in the family, child and forced marriage is widespread.

The objective of this research study was to explore perspectives of a broad range of professionals on factors that contribute to the occurrence of child and forced marriage in Morocco. ¬†Methods: A qualitative approach was used to generate both primary and secondary data for the analysis. Primary data consist of individual semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 22 professionals from various sectors: health, legal, education, NGO’s and government.

Sources of secondary data include academic papers, government and NGO reports, various legal documents and media reports. Data were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis.  Results: Four major themes arose from the data, indicating that the following elements contribute to child and forced marriage: (1) the legal and social divergence in conceptualizing forced and child marriage; (2) the impact of legislation; (3) the role of education; and (4) the economic factor.

Emphasis was especially placed on the new Family Code or Moudawana as having the greatest influence on advancement of women’s rights in the sphere of marriage. However, participants pointed out that embedded patriarchal attitudes and behaviours limit its effectiveness.

Read More: http://7thspace.com/headlines/445657/determinants_of_child_and_forced_marriage_in_morocco_stakeholder_perspectives_on_health_policies_and_human_rights.html

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Follow us, like us and share with us

  • Like us on Facebook
  • Follow us on Twitter

Sign up for our newsletter

Our website uses cookies so that we can provide a better service. Continue to use the site as normal if you're happy with this, or find out how to manage cookies.

wp_footer(); ?>