Posts Tagged ‘honour based violence’

What It’s Like to Experience Female Genital Cutting

When she was 7 years old, Mariya Karimjee sat on a tarp in a neighbor woman’s living room and had an operation that would affect her life forever. As part of a family tradition in her small Dawoodi Bohra sect of Islam, Karimjee had part of her clitoris removed in a procedure that was meant to make it impossible for her to feel desire or “get turned on.”

“When I was younger, someone took a knife to my clitoris and cut out a small but significant part of me.”

Karimjee shared her story of slowly learning about what happened to her that day in Karachi, Pakistan, in 1995 on the radio program This American Life this week, and has written about her experience previously for The Big Roundtable. As she said in the recording, her mom referred to her budding sexuality and anatomy as a “bug” that needed to be taken out.

 “According to my mother, a bug was growing in an egg down there — her language not mine — and that it would hatch and eventually crawl to my brain, unless we removed it,” Karimjee said. So her mother took her to the neighbor woman’s house, and she received a gold necklace with a teardrop pearl pendant as a gift afterward.

“For two days [after the operation], I wore what I can only describe as a big-girl diaper wet with blood,” Karimjee said. “Peeing was so painful that I tried to last for hours without going until my mother explained that I could give myself an infection. For the next year, I’d break out into a cold sweat whenever I saw the kind-faced woman who, on a tarp on her living room floor, had spoken to me softly as she took a knife and cut me.”

Read M0re: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a58222/what-its-like-to-experience-female-genital-mutiliation/

Time 100: FGM campaigner Jaha Dukureh makes prestigious list

Anti-FGM campaigner Jaha Dukureh has been named one of the world’s most influential leaders by Time magazine alongside John Kerry, Angela Merkel, Aung San Suu Kyi, Bernie Sanders and Christine Lagarde.

Dukureh, the lead campaigner in the Guardian’s global media campaign to end female genital mutilation, was honoured in particular for her work in the US and the Gambia but is now campaigning to end the practice worldwide in a generation, using her experiences as a survivor to build public support.

She first came to prominence with the success of her change.org petition, which received more than 220,000 signatures, asking the Obama administration to conduct a new prevalence study into the current scope of FGM in the United States.

The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, with Jaha Dukureh.

The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, with Jaha Dukureh. Photograph: Alicia Canter for the Guardian

Now based in Atlanta, Dukureh has become the leading campaigner against FGM in the Gambia. She is of a new generation of young women in the country who are working through the media to make sure that the mutilation they have suffered is not repeated on their daughters.

Read More: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/21/time-100-fgm-campaigner-jaha-dukureh-makes-prestigious-list

 

Boy aged eight among known potential victims of forced marriage in UK

A boy as young as eight is among scores of children feared by judges to be at risk of forced marriage as official figures reveal police are struggling to bring cases to court.

Met Commander Mak Chishty

Met Commander Mak Chishty is the national police lead for forced marriage and honour-based violence. Photograph: Linda Nylind for the Guardian

The schoolboy – thought to be one of the UK’s youngest known potential victims of forced marriage – is among 71 children, teenagers and women in West Yorkshire guarded by special court orders since 2014.

His case came to light as police figures, obtained by the Guardian, showed that only a fraction of investigations into forced marriage result in a prosecution. Many are dropped because victims are too scared to give evidence against their abuser.

In West Yorkshire, five of the 51 cases investigated since June 2014 resulted in a suspect being charged.Thirty-five of these investigations were dropped due to “evidential difficulties”, of which 16 were “victim-based” problems, the figures show.

There was a similar pattern in the West Midlands, where 19 of its 31 investigations resulted in no charges – eight because the victims did not support further action. There has been one conviction so far under a new forced marriage law introduced in June 2014.

Read More: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/20/boy-eight-among-known-potential-victims-forced-marriage-uk

Professionals ‘Still Concerned About Tackling Honour-Based Violence’

Professionals are still concerned about tackling so-called honour-based violence because of “cultural sensitivities”, a Home Office Minister has admitted.

Karen Bradley said “certain professionals” still do not have the confidence to question harmful child abuse happening in the UK.

Professionals 'still concerned about tackling honour-based violence'

She raised the concerns during a House of Commons debate on breast ironing, a practice which originated in Cameroon but is now believed to have affected up to 1,000 girls in Britain.

Breast ironing uses hot objects heated on a stove to pound and massage girls’ breasts during puberty to retard their growth, in the belief it will make the girls less sexually attractive.

Questioned on the role of schools in tackling harmful practices such as female genital mutilation and breast ironing, the Minister (pictured) said: “I know there are certain professionals who may feel reticent about this.

 

Read More: http://www.careappointments.co.uk/care-news/england/item/39318-professionals-still-concerned-about-tackling-honour-based-violence

Forest Gate students organise forced marriage campaign

Everyone should have a choice in who they marry. That was the message at Azhar Academy Girls School, who arranged a forced marriage campaign to raise awareness of the issue.

Guest speakers at the school in Romford Road, Forest Gate, included representatives from the government’s Forced Marriage Unit and the Sharan project, which helps vulnerable women from south Asian communities.

Also speaking at the event was Cmdr Mak Chishty, the highest-ranking Muslim police officer in the UK.

Part of the afternoon saw girls and guests alike write statements on why they are against forced marriage, which were then put on display in the school.

Organisers Sabah Athar, 14, Arooj Khan, 14 and Maryam Rashid, 15

Organisers Sabah Athar, 14, Arooj Khan, 14 and Maryam Rashid, 15

They also learnt about the signs of forced marriage and where to go for support should they or a friend find themselves at risk.

Read More:  http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/education/forest_gate_students_organise_forced_marriage_campaign_1_4462408

UK is failing girls who flee forced marriage, says honour abuse survivor

At 12 years old, Shaheen Hashmat left her family home in Scotland to escape the threat of forced marriage to a stranger in Pakistan. At 13, she attempted suicide.

Hashmat, who now campaigns against forced marriage and “honour based” violence, says Britain urgently needs better mental health services for girls and women escaping these situations.

“There needs to be far more training about the increased risk of suicide and the impact of family estrangement,” said Hashmat, who won the True Honour 2016 award on Thursday for her bravery in standing up to honour abuse.

Experts say thousands of girls and women in Britain are subjected to  every year as a way of controlling behaviour perceived as bringing shame on their family. Hashmat, now 33, grew up in a strict Pakistani family in which every aspect of her life was policed from the TV she watched to the people she spoke to and even the way she sat.

She was beaten and saw others in her family beaten too. Her two older sisters were forced into marriage as teenagers after being sent “on holiday” to Pakistan. As she grew up she started to challenge what was happening around her. “If I had stayed the physical abuse would have increased because I was seen as being out of control and becoming too westernised,” she told Thomson Reuters Foundation.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuters/article-3487516/UK-failing-girls-flee-forced-marriage-says-honour-abuse-survivor.html#ixzz42bffpQyO

Forced Marriage Campaign: Seasonal Reminder Ahead of Easter School Holidays

Ahead of the start of the school Easter holiday, West Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) and West Yorkshire Police is reminding people of the signs to look out for of forced marriage and honour-based violence.

Campaign poster

A forced marriage is where one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities, cannot) consent to the marriage and pressure or abuse is used.

The pressure put on people to marry against their will can be physical (including threats, actual physical violence and sexual violence) or emotional and psychological (for example, when someone is made to feel like they’re bringing shame on their family). Financial abuse (taking your wages or not giving you any money) can also be a factor.

From June 2014, it became a crime to force someone to marry against their will.

Over the school holidays intelligence suggests that there tends to be an increase in forced marriages. In the run up to, and over the easter holidays, officers are working with schools, airport staff and the wider community in raising awareness of the signs to spot that someone may be being forced to marry against their will or be a victim of honour-based violence.

Read More: http://www.westyorkshire.police.uk/news/forced-marriage-campaign-seasonal-reminder-ahead-easter-school-holidays

YEP Says: Backing the fight to eradicate honour violence

IF NISHA’s ordeal was an isolated one, it would be bad enough.

That many young women have had to endure similar experiences is a reminder that our society still has a long way to go to eradicate honour-based violence and forced marriage.

PICTURE POSED BY MODEL.

The Karma Nirvana charity took 126 calls from victims in Leeds last year and 358 from West Yorkshire.

“Without a doubt, Leeds has more cases than what we are seeing reflected in the figures,” said charity founder Jasvinder Sanghera. “The worrying thing is there are young people across the city that don’t know that forced marriage is a criminal offence and it is wrong. They have taught to be silent. “It is under-reported and we have a duty to bring it above the ground.

“We want an increase in the number of cases being reported, to reduce isolation and ultimately save lives.” There is hope, as Nisha demonstrated when she managed to break free from her domestic prison.

Read more: http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/your-leeds/yep-says/yep-says-backing-the-fight-to-eradicate-honour-violence-1-7778652#ixzz42JtnDxIW

Read more: http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/your-leeds/yep-says/yep-says-backing-the-fight-to-eradicate-honour-violence-1-7778652#ixzz42JthMPTX

Oscars 2016: Winning filmmaker gives powerful speech about honour killings in Pakistan

Filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy made a powerful speech at the #Oscars last night, after winning the award for best documentary short. But rather than using the platform to gush thanks, Obaid-Chinoy took the chance to speak out about the topic of her film: #honourkillings.

Pakistani filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy's film A Girl in the River

The practice – where men kill their own female family members for ‘dishonouring’ them, typically by having relationships they disapprove of – is particularly common in Pakistan.

Obaid-Chinoy’s film A Girl In The River: The Price of Forgiveness shines a light on such killings. It tells the story of Saba Qaiser, a real young woman in Pakistan who survived attempted murder by her father and uncle after she married someone they felt ‘dishonoured’ the family.

Her film has garnered international attention, leading officials in Pakistan to promise they will work to end the illegal practice.

Read More: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/life/oscars-2016-winning-filmmaker-gives-powerful-speech-about-honour/

Courts step in to stop nine-year-old girl from being sent to Afghanistan to marry her cousin, 18

Police and social workers stepped in to stop a nine-year-old girl from being sent to Afghanistan to marry an 18-year-old cousin, a judge heard.

The girl’s mother had told social services staff that her father was planning the trip, Mr Justice MacDonald heard. Another judge had made both parents the subject of forced marriage protection orders after child protection specialists began legal moves.

Police and social workers stepped in to stop a nine-year-old girl from being sent to Afghanistan to marry an 18-year-old cousin, a judge at the High Court (pictured) heard 

Orders barred the couple from ‘permitting’ the girl to ‘undergo marriage’. Detail of the case has emerged in a ruling by Mr Justice MacDonald following a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London.

The girl had been temporarily taken into local authority care in the wake of her mother’s allegation

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3412260/Courts-step-stop-nine-year-old-girl-sent-Afghanistan-marry-cousin-18.html#ixzz3xzYJcEqd

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